CSOGIE Resources

Two New Resources to Support CSWE Position Statement on Conversion/Reparative Therapy

CSWE recently released a position statement condemning conversion/reparative therapy. The statement was written collaboratively by Edward J. Alessi and Shelley L. Craig, co-chairs of the Council on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression (CSOGIE); the members of CSOGIE; and Darla Spence Coffey, president and CEO of CSWE. CSOGIE has created two companion resources to support educators to discuss these issues in their classrooms.

  • How to Talk About Sexual Orientation Change Efforts in Social Work Education—designed to help social work educators facilitate conversation about sexual orientation change efforts (SOCE), commonly referred to as conversion or reparative therapy, and how to teach affirmative practice as it relates to sexual orientation and gender identity. This resource was prepared by Peggy Pittman-Munke (Murray State University), Jayleen Galarza (Shippensburg University), George Jacinto (University of Central Florida), Edward J. Alessi (Rutgers University), and Shelley L. Craig (University of Toronto).  

Social Work Students Speak Out! The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students in Social Work Programs

Social Work Students Speak Out! The Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students in Social Work Programs is a new study report from the CSWE Council on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression (CSOGIE). Authored by Shelley L. Craig (University of Toronto), Lauren B. McInroy (University of Toronto), Michael P. Dentato (Loyola University Chicago), Ashley Austin (Barry University), and Lori Messinger (University of North Carolina Wilmington), this report examines the needs of LGBTQ students in social work programs and the barriers they face. A total of 1,018 LGBTQ students in 51 states and Canadian provinces took part in the study. One-third of those students reported experiencing some form of homophobia during their social work education, whereas 64% indicated some degree of support for their LGBTQ identities in their programs. Forty-four percent of students reported limited inclusion of LGBTQ content in classes. Recommendations to address the needs of LGBTQ students at the national, institutional, and program levels are offered. 

 

More on This